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It seems that even the State of California, disparingly referred to as full of flakes fruits and nuts , has better approaches to education than all the supperannuated socialists at the Department of Education in Northern Ireland.

http://www.latimes.com/news/la-me-charter31-2009may31,0,617272.story?track=ntothtml

Detention After School 

Dave Getzschman / For the Times
Students sit in detention at American Indian Public Charter school in Oakland for offenses ranging from getting up during class or skipping a problem on a homework assignment. Students who misbehave in the slightest must stay an hour after school; if they misbehave again in the same week, they get more detention and four hours of Saturday detention.

 

Dave Getzschman / For the TimesStudents sit in detention at American Indian Public Charter school in Oakland for offenses ranging from getting up during class or skipping a problem on a homework assignment. Students who misbehave in the slightest must stay an hour after school; if they misbehave again in the same week, they get more detention and four hours of Saturday detention.

 

Not many schools in California recruit teachers with language like this:

 “We are looking for hard working people who believe in free market capitalism. . . . Multicultural specialists, ultra liberal zealots and college-tainted oppression liberators need not apply.”

School administrators take pride in their record of frequently firing teachers they consider to be underperforming. Unions are embraced with the same warmth accorded

 “self-esteem experts, panhandlers, drug dealers and those snapping turtles who refuse to put forth their best effort,”

 to quote the school’s website.

Conservatives, including columnist George Will, adore the American Indian schools, which they see as models of a “new paternalism” that could close the gap between the haves and have-nots in American education. Not surprisingly, many Bay Area liberals have a hard time embracing an educational philosophy that proudly proclaims that it “does not preach or subscribe to the demagoguery of tolerance.”

It would be easy to dismiss American Indian as one of the nuttier offshoots of the fast-growing charter school movement, which allows schools to receive public funding but operate outside of day-to-day district oversight. But the schools command attention for one very simple reason: By standard measures, they are among the very best in California.

Read this article published in the Los Angeles Times and ask yourself why you have tolerated a decade of underperformance by richly rewarded educationalists and bureaucrats.

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