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1919 - 2011

 

Fred Naylor, the co-founder of the Parental Alliance for Choice in Education has died, aged 92.  Fred , who was in charge of the Bath Technical School, which later became Culverhay School, was actively involved in local and national education even after his retirement.

He was born in St Helen’s in Lancashire and after leaving school, went to study chemistry at Pembroke College, Cambridge.

It was while he was there that he met his future wife Marjorie, also a teacher, who died just a month before him, in September at the age of 86.

Fred Naylor taught at a number of schools around the country, including ones in Leeds and in Scotland, before joining the Bath Technical School in 1963.

While he was there he was seconded to work in London, on an educational think tank. It was during this time that the school system in Bath was reformed and went comprehensive, a change Mr Naylor was opposed to, so when his job was re-advertised he did not apply.

Instead, he went to work at Newton Park College, which later became Bath Spa University, and was involved with teacher training.

Mr Naylor and his family lived in Kingsdown, near Box, and throughout his retirement he continued to be interested in the local education system.

He set up the Parental Alliance for Choice in Education (PACE), which campaigned for parents to have more say over schooling, and was also active in the National Grammar Schools Association (NGSA).

His work with these organisations led him to meet many influential politicians, including Margaret Thatcher and David Cameron.

One of Fred Naylor’s many publications had a particular  emphasis on the Northern Ireland  education system. Education for the 21st Century: Report by the Post Primary Review Body was published in October 2001 at the behest of Martin  McGuinness,  Northern Ireland’s education  minister. Known colloquially as the Burns Report, it  advocates   abolishing Northern Ireland’s grammar and secondary (modern) schools and  setting up a  new ‘collegial system’ of  comprehensive schools without any concern for standards.

 

The pamphlet, Comprehensive  Ideology: Burns and the Betrayal of Two Communities  was  written in response, though it  is also  relevant to the rest of the UK.

 

The authors of the Burns  Report have failed to grasp that comprehensivisation has reduced educational  opportunities on the mainland.  Ever  since 1972, when research  by  the National Foundation for Educational  Research (NFER)   showed that  comprehensivisation  was a handicap to  raising  standards, the destruction of  selective schools has been pursued for ideological, not educational,  reasons.

The Burns Report  is riddled with incoherences and omissions,  not least the remarkable achievements of secondary (modern) schools.  Fred Naylor uses quotations from  supporters of comprehensivisation to show how  illiberal they are and how they are undermining the Human Rights of parents.  His analysis demonstrates that the ‘comprehensive principle’ is designed, not  to protect and preserve different cultures, but to destroy them.

It is timely that the warnings provided by Fred Naylor and PACE are available to counter the cynical efforts of Sinn Fein Education Ministers determined to remove parental rights in education.

 

Comprehensive Ideology costs £4.00 including postage  from 18 Westlands Grove, York YO31 1EF.

 

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